Lessons on the Most Comfortable Intercourse Position During Pregnancy

Sex spices up the relationship especially when the woman is pregnant. This may occur shocking to you but that is what exactly what makes it all the more special. The thing which few people do during pregnancy it what makes the act of lovemaking more intimate and extraordinary. Actually, there is nothing to fear about making love when you are expecting a child. As long as you know how to do the most comfortable positions during pregnancy, then there is nothing to worry about. The child is deep inside your womb, safely protected from external factors that would do him harm. As long as your partner doesn’t thrust inside you so violently or deeply during sexual intercourse, then there is nothing to worry about.

Have you noticed the physical make up of your womb? There is a noticeable gap between the vulva of the vagina and the baby. It only means that nature already contemplated the instance where a woman might still be engaging in sexual acts even being pregnant or at least nature allows it to happen. Hence, the baby is safely tucked away deep inside the uterus.

It is admitted that it is still important to practice caution, hence we gave lessons about the correct pregnancy intercourse positions. There are different of doing this which are proven to give every couple satisfaction just like in normal sex. Be able to hurdle the obstacle of getting intimate with your wife or husband during pregnancy by taking time to learn the proper pregnancy intercourse positions.

No Sex Drive During Pregnancy

When a woman is pregnant, her sex drive can be unpredictable. Some women find that their libido goes through the roof when they are pregnant, while others seem to lose their desire to have sex all together. Both experiences are normal but having a low sex drive can be frustrating for a couple’s relationship.

There are a lot of reasons why a woman may have a low sex drive when she’s pregnant. It may be because she is more tired or feeling ill. Some women have difficulty adjusting to their new pregnant body and may feel unattractive or find sex itself is difficult. Finding comfortable positions may be challenging when you have a big belly in your way. Still, sometimes a woman really doesn’t know why she’s not interested. This may just be a result of hormonal changes.

Talk to your partner about how you are feeling. You shouldn’t feel pressured to have sex if it is not comfortable or pleasurable for you, but at the same time, it may be unfair to expect your partner to do without sex for unreasonably long periods. If there is a medical reason for abstaining from intercourse, this may be unavoidable but if your low sex drive is the only reason for not having sex with your partner, you should talk to him about it.

Sometimes it just takes longer to get in the mood. You may want to try things that help you relax and feel more sexual. Taking a warm bath, getting or giving a massage, going out on a romantic date, are all ideas that may help you feel more attractive, sexual and more in the mood. Some women may struggle with a low sex drive through their entire pregnancy and find that nothing really works to overcome this. The best thing a woman can do is communicate with her partner to find ways to work around this.

Teaching Tips on Safe Sex High School Education

Good sex education should allow the adolescent to talk freely about sex and its relationship to interpersonal relations, dynamics within a relationship, love, family and his/her future. Sex education should be open enough so that the atmosphere in the classroom is comfortable and the adolescent does not feel inhibited when asking questions.

Unfortunately, most parents’ actions are less a result of planning in advance, and more often reactions to children’s provocations. This necessitates the importance of exposing adolescents to as much information as possible. An educator’s goal should provide them with information regarding different types of sex protection and to impart knowledge based on holistic attitudes.

Suggestions for how Sex Education could be presented in High School

On International AIDS day, High School students can visit people with AIDS in hospitals or in their homes so that these people feel they have somebody to comfort and nurture them, even if it is only for a day. The students can help AIDS patients’ children (if they have children) with schoolwork and/or games just to reassure the sick ones with AIDS in a constructive way.

One powerful method of exposing students to subjects such as unwanted pregnancy and abortion is through films. Show a film about a teenage girl who is pregnant and decides to have an abortion discreetly without the knowledge of her parents. After the film, divide the class into two groups: one group being the teenage girl and the other group as the parents. Pose the question: “Would you tell your parents that you are pregnant?” and, if so, “How would you tell them?” In essence, conduct a role play where the challenge is to express themselves openly as if they were in that situation. Roles plays, if well constructed, can be very effective teaching devices.

Finally, ask the question, “Do you have an open relationship with your parents where you can talk about problems regarding sex, the dynamics of a relationship with a boy or girl or about sex prevention?” If some of the students’ answers are negative, pose the question: “What can you do so that your relationship with your parents can be freer and more open?” Finally, raise the key question: “Does it bother you that you do not have an open relationship with your parents?”

Another method of teaching sex education is having the students fill out questionnaires about AIDS. In spite of the fact that many students may have heard about the AIDS disease, not many know its causes and what it is exactly. Questions such as: “Can you reduce chances of infection by taking birth control pills? Can you get AIDS by donating blood? And “Can you get AIDS from oral sex?” are some of the relevant questions to ask. Afterwards, hand out the same questionnaire and have them interview their friends, neighbors, relatives, family members and compare the results among the members of the class. The purpose of this questionnaire is to present several topics such as: “What can we say about the fact that people do not know the answers? Is it the fault of the school, family or society? Do you think it is good or bad that your parents do not expose or share their feelings/knowledge about AIDS, prevention of sexual diseases and contraceptives? Would you like your parents to talk to you about these things?” This activity focuses on the parent-adolescent relationships regarding talking about sex and what can be done in allaying the adolescents’ doubts, fear and anxieties.

Perhaps this chunk of “something else” can be nurturingly provided by the school system or in parent-teacher meetings where these issues should be discussed openly. After such meetings, new or seasoned High School teachers of sex education will not be so inhibited in talking about it with their students, similar to parents talking with their children.